Topics 2015

Digital

Innovations report “New York Times”: How to be successful in print and online

Ten employees of the “New York Times” have been investigating for half a year how the media scene is developing and what does the “New York Times” stop from being as successful with online as they are with print. They have asked themselves many questions – and found solutions: For example why the traditional print categories don’t work for online. What can well-established media learn from Buzzfeed, Heftig & Co. “You might like that too” – how to keep users on the website. Why one has to get rid of ineffective experiments immediately. How one can get closer to the user and why social media are not the only way for achieving that. What do we have to do, to keep digital talents in our editorial offices and to get news online-experts and software engineers in media companies – and why this is a task for the management.
In Vienna Andrew Phelps, one of the leading digital minds of the “New York Times” and Adam Ellick, one of the star-video-journalists of the newspaper, will present the results of the report, in which they have been participating. They are also responsible for the realization of the results. Also the latest results and the development of the last few months will be presented.

From the crisis of the systems to „Constant Beta“

The main problem of established media houses is the condition of IT-supported processes in the editorial office and production. In short: a crisis of content management systems. The responsible´s issues are rather the old infrastructure than the development of new content since they fundamentaly prevent new innovations. Successful new editorial offices like „Business Insider“ or „Buzzfeed“ have their own powerful system, there´s a big technological advantage in the competion of articles. Often the innovative and flexible developments get stifled by expensive and relativley slow enterprise-technologies of the 2000´s or even 90´s. The most important question is: How to get to a constant improvement of the systems („Constant Beta“) and how to fill it with life in the organisation.
Heiko Scherer is and experienced softwaredeveloper and gives insight into the requirements of the mobile internet and up-to-date solutions. He presents a series of smooth and promising examples which give the management and editorial office the opportunity to only focus on the development of content.

Innovations report “New York Times”: How to be successful in print and online

Ten employees of the “New York Times” have been investigating for half a year how the media scene is developing and what does the “New York Times” stop from being as successful with online as they are with print. They have asked themselves many questions – and found solutions: For example why the traditional print categories don’t work for online. What can well-established media learn from Buzzfeed, Heftig & Co. “You might like that too” – how to keep users on the website. Why one has to get rid of ineffective experiments immediately. How one can get closer to the user and why social media are not the only way for achieving that. What do we have to do, to keep digital talents in our editorial offices and to get news online-experts and software engineers in media companies – and why this is a task for the management.
In Vienna Andrew Phelps, one of the leading digital minds of the “New York Times” and Adam Ellick, one of the star-video-journalists of the newspaper, will present the results of the report, in which they have been participating. They are also responsible for the realization of the results. Also the latest results and the development of the last few months will be presented.

“20 Minuten” Switzerland/Luxembourg/Denmark: What does a strong digitalisation mean?

“20 Minuten” is one of the greatest stories of success in Europe. In Switzerland the free newspaper has been established as the larges daily newspaper and largest online news platform within only seven years. After starting in the German part of Switzerland, Tamedia successfully brought the concept to Western Switzerland, Tessin and Luxembourg. Since two years the Swiss publishing company is trying to gain ground in Denmark. In doing so, they have to fight with a very regressive print market and a strong digitalisation in Scandinavia. Is this a developement we also have to be prepared for? Can the experiences of “20 Minuten” in Denmark help us?
In Vienna Marcel Kohler will explain how “20 Minuten” is working in five different markets with four different languages. He will show what is working in all markets, how the special circumstances are handled in Denmark and how it will all turn out to be a story of success.

Interim results

Three innovative projects, that started these months. How are they doing now?

Introduction to a multimedia reporter-newspaper
“Handelsblatt” is changing like never before

Compulsory attendance in the editorial office is no longer necessary. Editors can decide themselves where to spend their working hours. This sounds like an exciting experiment of a small medium, which had to find a compromise. But actually even Germans largest economic newspaper „Handelsblatt“ is now working with this system. The consideration behind it is to get more exclusive stories. But the changes in the editorial offices are much more profound: The editorial offices of print and digital are going to merge. Almost 200 editors are arranged in teams and are deciding on their own authority, which text can be offered for the different media platforms – the short news for online and the profound analysis for the printed newspaper.
“Goal of the new structure is it to make the work flow easier, to eliminate unnecessary barriers and to push on quality-journalism”, says Gabor Steingart, director of “Handelsblatt”. In Vienna he will present the concept of a multimedia reporter-newspaper.

Relentlessly omitting! And being extraordinary cool!
“Südostschweiz” just reinvented the newspaper

Where is it still possible to grow? What do people want? How is their consumerism? The result is a completely new local daily newspaper. With less ballast and obligation. The part of the news has become thinner. But there is definitely more space for own stories and background. And: The visual part is on equal terms with the text. The number of articles gets reduced by 25 to 30 percent. Instead of hunting the “small-small”, editors have the possibility to work even two days on just one story. The main idea: The newspaper should differ from the free online offers. And it should offer a real surplus in daily life instead of becoming wastepaper within ten minutes. To achieve that “Südostschweiz” is counting on topics of service from tips for child education to tips for financial investments. In Vienna chief editor David Sieber and director Silvio Lebrument will explain how they are rearranging “Südostschweiz” and why they are having no fear of any revenge of the readers.

NZZ.at – first impressions so far
Does that work? Quality without paper? “Neue Zürcher Zeitung” is breaking new ground in Austria

A risky project with an insecure result or an exciting road into the future? After the German “Zeit” which appeared with a mutation for print in Austria, the Swiss “NZZ” has now started with an Austrian online edition. With Michael Fleischhacker one of the most noted journalists of the country is responsible for NZZ online. Fleischhacker has been working as chief editor for “Presse” for eight years. Now he has been getting rid of printed media. If it were up to him newspapers would vanish immediately. Fleischhacker and his team are working on new forms of journalism and ways of presentation. They are also trying to find new ways other online services haven’t been taking so far.
In Vienna Michael Fleischhacker will give a summary about NZZ.at – what did work, what didn’t, what was to be expected, what were the surprises.

Strategy

Only bad news are good news! Really?
How to win relevance and readers again with a new journalistic approach

Accidents, wars, demonstrations, corruption – and of course many corpses. Our news are loaded with such information. Where there is blood, there is the next headline. But do we really show reality? Or do we scare more and more people – and in doing so lose ground for our own future? Aren’t more and more readers running away because they can’t stand the cruelties in our newspapers? But what can be the alternative? Fair weather reports. Pretty girls, blue skies, sunshine? Or is there a third way? A way for relevant journalism, which secures readers for us? Or even gets us new readers?
In Vienna Ulrik Haagerup shows that there is already a new, modern access to news which is balanced and which shows not only the dark sides but also the good sides. In doing so many new readers, listeners and viewers can be won.

A new competition for the clever minded
How can we manage elites in media companies? How can we commit them to ourselves?

The new elite is clever, self-confident, environmentally sound and at its head there will be women. The feminization of society as well as the demographic development will be a challenge. The first indicator for this challenge is the Social Freezing Apple and Facebook are offering. The second screen generation has grown up. Today it isn’t very sexy anymore to earn money with media or even printed media. Even Google or Facebook are old economy for the generations Y and Z. And: The call of money doesn’t work anymore, because the next generations of employees have lost their trust in capital and politics. So, what can a media company do to get more attractive for the clever minded? How do future elites want to be guided? Has the chief editor lost his dominance for the written word and has become a manager of creativity and talent?
In Vienna Werner Katzengruber will show how media companies can make progress again when it comes to the topic of staff. Maybe they can even build a new future instead of letting the future build us.

Case studies

Four extraordinary media projects and their creators.

Case Study “Tubantia”: A generous layout on the Cover, national information bundled on the inside pages
“Tubantia”, The Netherlands, is Europe’s regional newspaper of the year

For two months a woman has been lying dead in her house in Eschede. “Tubantia” did a cover story “The lonesome death” – illustrated with a dead flower and seeds that are blown away. “Tubantia” knows how to get emotional and to take the readers on a journey of feelings. At the same time the newspaper has a clear structure – even though it is tabloid-format, one can easily take out “his” part of the newspaper. In Vienna the chief editor will stand for both: local and national. But well bundled!
“Tubantia” is published in Eschede, The Netherlands. The newspaper has a print run of 100.000 copies in tabloid-format and is tacked. It has several sections, which are made as pullouts. 100 journalists, 8 photographers and 4 designers are working for the newspaper.

Case Study “SonntagsZeitung”: This straight design could be the future
“SonntagsZeitung”, Switzerland, is Europe’s weekly newspaper of the Year

“SonntagsZeitung” is permanently in a process of modernization. The latest style: reduction to the essential, clear navigation and a general reduction of elements. “SonntagsZeitung” wants to abstain from all knick-knack, so that the readers can concentrate on the content. In doing so it is clearly differing from other newspapers. And “SonntagsZeitung” is one of the first newspapers where this reduction works. The straight design could be the future.
In Vienna the chief editor will talk about the planning of topics on Sunday. Which journalists are the proper ones for that job? Why was there so much reduction in the newspaper?
“SonntagsZeitung” is published in Zurich in Berlin format. It has a print run of 194.000 copies. Due to cooperations with other daily newspapers the print run in the harsh market of Switzerland could be raised with 12.000 copies. 49 journalists, 1 photographer and a pool of freelance photographers as well as 14 designers work for the newspaper.

Case Study “The Mayo News”: Real storytelling happens in the mind
“The Mayo News”, Ireland, is Europe’s local newspaper of the year.

Only 8.750 copies – at least 500 more than two years ago. And now this: It is almost unbelievable how a team of 8 journalists, 1 Photographer and 4 (!) designers can manage this kind of storytelling every week. The newspaper is constantly getting redesigned – in content as well as in design. A highlight are the generous double pages in the sports section and in the local section. White space helps to present the content in a perfect way. “The Mayo News” is an uncommon example of how a small team can achieve something big – and it is a role model for large teams: creativity needs creative minds!
In Vienna the chief editor will show how he can organize and motivate his team – and why there is one designer for every two journalists.
“The Mayo News” is published in the province Mayo in Ireland. The local weekly newspaper has already been awarded as Europe’s best local newspaper at the European Newspaper Award 2007. Since then it has become even better.

Case Study “Público”: Perfect brand management on all platforms
“Público”, Portugal, is Europe’s national daily newspaper of the year

“Público” has a very clear design without frills. Thanks to the reduction to only a few elements the design is very distinctive – and is suited perfectly to a perfect brand management on all platforms. Typography, the use of pictures, the layout – everything is realized perfectly from the first page to the last. The website publico.pt already got an award last year. Print and online are going hand in hand.
Im Vienna the chief editor will show that the management of a news-brand is not that difficult, if one is considering some important points.
“Público” is published in Lisbon. It is published in tabloid-format and has a print run of 36.000 copies. The newspaper is tacked. The website publico.pt is the largest news-website in Portugal, which also is used in South America very often as an independent source of information. The newspaper has 108 journalists, 8 photographers and 11 designers.

Media start-ups*

What start-ups are doing differently from publishers and what can we learn?

Precious journalism cannot just be given away
Is the time ripe for noble, independent paid content?

Georg Dahm has made his experiences as a journalist with high-quality contents which were sold under it´s worth. He was an editor for the chronically underfinanced „Financial Times Deutschland“ and later for the weekly magazine „New Scientist“. From this time he learned two lessons: First, good stories require a high price. Second, there are people willing to pay this price – as long as there´s the right selection. Because of that he and Denis Dilba established „substanzmagazin.de“. For 9€ a month this is a multimedial longform-journalism in the branch of popular literature. „Substanz“ is the first german magazine at no cost which is run only as a digital brand without any precursor in print and a supporting established publisher. A crowdfunding campaign made it possible to start the project in November 2014. Since then the editorial office publishes every week a lavishly produced contribution using all the possibilites of HTML5. Smaller articles complete the selection which has to prove it´s worth on the market. Is the time ripe for noble, independent paid content?

A new “Brigitte” from Berlin

“EDITION F” is an online magazine founded in 2014 in Berlin, which is called a “Business Lifestyle Plattform” by the two directors. With a package for content “EDITION F” is meant to be a daily source of inspiration for women who want to succeed in job and in life. “EDITION F” is closing a gap in German media market which hasn’t been taken by any other publishing company so far. The most important part is a journalistic high quality supply with meaningful and service-orientated articles. As a community “EDITION F” supports the professional and the private exchange of users. “EDITION F” also is a platform for finding jobs and a marketplace for fashion and products. Mathias Döpfner, director of Axel Springer says: “EDITION F” prooves that journalism has a fascinating future in the digital world and that it can be a scaleable business model.” At the European Newspaper Congress the founders will explain the integrated concept of “EDITION F” and will show what makes their work with content unique – from the algorithm to the cooperation with big publishing companies.

Video Keynote from the Sillicon Valley: 2 million „citizen journalists“ participating in social networks

Buffer is a software application designed to manage social networks, by providing the means for a user to schedule posts to Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin. The application was designed by a group of European expats in San Francisco. The two major co-founders of the applications are Joel Gascoigne, who is also the Chief Executive Officer of the company, and Leo Widrich, who is also the Chief Operating Officer of Buffer. By December 2014, the team reached 29 people from different parts of the world. As of January 2015, Buffer has more than 2,000,000 registered users.

Your News in Motion – How News are transformed into beautiful short video summaries

Wibbitz is an innovative startup company creating a unique technology that automatically turns long text articles into informative video summaries. The Wibbitz technology is based on clever algorithms and artificial intelligence and has the ability to turn almost any text-based article into a video in just 5 seconds. The technology has the ability to dramatically increase publisher’s video supply, an increasingly valuable media. Wibbitz urges you to “watch the articles you want” instead of read them. What that boils down to is Wibbitz’s bread and butter or what it refers to as “video summaries.”

Social Content Sharing – New Ways of User Engagement – From Paywall to Sharewall

A new Internet service for online publishers, is unveiling a new way for readers to pay for online news content by introducing social sharing as a currency. The service helps digital publishers enter the social sharing community and drive more traffic to their sites, while still pleasing readers by offering free content. Online readers are used to getting free content. Instead of losing them by charging money for news, publishers can give them the content and on top of that drive additional social traffic to their website.


Pictures 2015

European Newspaper Congress 2015

Mehr Bilder:
Nutzungsrecht: Bilder frei zur redaktionellen Verwendung im Zusammenhang mit Berichterstattung
Credit: Medienfachverlag Oberauer/APA-Fotoservice/Schedl

Sponsors 2015

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